Storytelling and AR

23 November, 2010 (09:11) | Augmented Reality, Books | By: Panos

Kat Austen in New Scientist’s Culture lab presents a very interesting post on AR books. By AR books we – currently – refer to books that have some added information in the form of extra visuals which are projected through a a web-cam-equipped computer, tracking the book’s features, such as pictures, QR Codes etc. The post mentions¬† some of the books that appeared this year, such as Fairyland Magic from Carlton Books and Tyrone the Clean’o’saurus from Salariya Publishing and presents the author’s experience with them. Kat also mentions Camille Sherrer’s Souvenirs du Monde des Montagnes along with a video bellow.

We cannot help but agree with the author’s overall assessment that, overall, the current AR books have an element that makes them impressive initially but they eventually lose their grip on the reader – particularly the young ones. Moreover, the set-up required usually to achieve those augmentations is not exactly convenient, especially when you simply want to ‘dazzle’ your kid with an elaborate story.

It so happens that this is our view on many matters of current AR. Things are impressive on first sight but when you pass the ‘wow, what’s this!’¬† point, they often fall short. We are planning¬† to investigate in the future, the sense of immersion of various AR book paradigms through user assessments.